Madrid for 25€

For some reason, I had it in my head that I wouldn’t need a place to stay for my overnight layover in Madrid. I had a foggy vision of heading out to see the city, and then coming back late to crash at the airport before my flight to Seville left early Monday morning.

When I came down with a sore throat a few days before the trip, I came to my senses. I am not a night owl and I need my sleep. I can’t function without it. (Read: I’m kind of a bitch if I don’t sleep enough.) No way was I going to rough it on a cold, hard, dirty airport floor for six hours.

La Vie En C Rose: Madrid Airport

But the Madrid metro doesn’t start running until 6am, and I worried about missing my flight. I looked into airport hotels (50 to 100 euros on Hotel Tonight) but that didn’t seem practical as I couldn’t find one accessible by public transport. The “hotel” in the airport cost over 100 euros – not the budget I had in mind for this crash visit.

So when I arrived, I went straight to the tourist information to get some help.

“I don’t know where I’m going to sleep tonight,” I said in what is left of my high school Spanish. The lovely agent advised me to stay at a hostel in the center and take an early bus to catch my flight.

“Actually, you can catch a train to the city instead of the metro or bus. It leaves in twelve minutes.”

A nice lady with lipstick on her teeth helped me get the right train ticket (2,60€, score!) and I was off to Madrid.

My first impression, even before exiting the train station, was how quiet, clean, and still Madrid was. No trash in the station or on the street. Few people out and about. It was warm and pink flowering trees were planted along the tranquil streets. I stopped into a building marked “Hostal Prim” next to the station. The owner offered me a discount off the regular price of 35 euros for a private room, which is a steal, but I knew I could stay for much cheaper at a dorm hostel, so I continued to the one the tourist agent had marked on the map for me.

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In the Chueca neighborhood, sunny terraces, trendy cafes, and fun boutiques abounded. Well, “abounded” borders on exaggeration as it was Sunday and many places were closed. But I was immediately charmed by the neighborhood and regretted that I wouldn’t be there long enough to have coffee in the blue restaurant below the hostel.

La Vie En C Rose Madrid

I stayed at Hostal Barbieri; there was wifi, a locker with a lock, a bed for the night, and it cost me all of 12 euros.

It was already 4:30pm, so I headed out to make the most of the few hours I had in Madrid. The sunniest ray of the day were gone, but it was still pleasant and warm. I went straight to Parc Retiro.

La Vie En C Rose Madrid

Parc Retiro was green and manicured and expansive. Parents strolled with their strollers, children rode bikes and scooters, and couples of all ages made out on the benches and in the grass.

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The main strip of the park was like Disneyland: crowded, with artists, musicians, human statues (you know, covered in metallic paint, except these guys were mid-conversation instead of pretending to be inanimate), vendors, and actual Disney characters.

La Vie En C Rose Madrid

La Vie En C Rose Madrid

Other parts were quiet and hidden under a green canopy of trees.

La Vie En C Rose Madrid

I stopped by the lauded crystal palace, but it was closed for the installation of what looked like colorful silk tents and pillows.

La Vie En C Rose Madrid

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When it threatened to rain, no one seemed bothered. And they were right. The drops stopped a minute later.

La Vie En C Rose Madrid
I envisioned sunny picnics in the green corners of the park, long strolls through its winding paths.

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I had only eaten clementines and half a package of bacon tuc crackers (have you had these crackers? They are my favorite) so I exited the park to continue my tour of Madrid and find food (an empanadilla, 1,55€). I walked west, zigzagging on slanted streets. I passed the botanical gardens and the Prado museum, surveilled by armed guards. I regret not heading further south to pass through the Lavapies neighborhood, but before long, I was at La Latina.

La Vie En C Rose Madrid

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The whole neighborhood was a party. Terraces overflowed, the lively streets babbled with music and chatter. I thought of stopping for tapas, but I felt awkward sitting down at a table for one in such a busy, social environment. So I kept walking, up Calle Cava Baja, and as I went further north, the crowd got older and the restaurants more touristy, with multi-language menus and photos of their food plastered outside.

Madrid La Vie En C Rose

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I stopped by the Mercado San Miguel, but it was so crowded, it was a nightmare just to walk through.

La Vie En C Rose Madrid

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Onward, I stopped by the Palacio Real and the Catedral de La Almudena (although I didn’t know what it was called).

La Vie En C Rose

La Vie En C Rose Madrid
Catedral de La Almudena
Palacio Real Madrid, La Vie En C Rose
Palacio Real

Plaza de Espana looked adjacent on the map, but somehow I passed it and ended up on the grassy hill of Templo de Debod. This, it turned out, was more impressive than the actual Plaza de Espana, which was a very large monument, many tourist stands, and teenagers making out on the grass.

La Vie En C Rose Madrid

Templo de Debod Madrid La Vie En C Rose
Templo de Debod
Plaza de España Madrid La Vie En C Rose
Plaza de España

I had been walking for several hours and my feet were starting to ache. I passed by a cervezaria I had read about near Noviciado (Pontepez), and sat down at the bar. It a relief to take a load off and have a glass of white. (7€ for a small dinner/large tapa and wine)

Pontepez Madrid La Vie En C Rose
Pontepez Cervezaria

From there, it was a short walk home. (Well, home for the night, anyway.)  The next day, I was up early to catch the RENFE train back to the airport (2,60€).

Madrid Airport La Vie En C Rose

And by 9am, I was in Seville.